CALLING ALL LATINX ARTISTS!

Self-identifying Latinx and Hispanic artists of all mediums are encouraged to submit work for consideration to be displayed in the premiere event Colors of Life: Latina Artists for National Hispanic Heritage Month.

As part of the second annual Día de los Muertos celebration, the exhibit at Creative Women of the World downtown will honor artists in coordination with National Hispanic Heritage Month, which takes place from September 15 to October 15.

Creative Women of the World is a nonprofit fair-trade store that supports female leaders worldwide. The storefront is host year-round to products that celebrate talent of women who seek to build on their entrepreneurial skills.

The artwork submission deadline is April 23, with exhibit dates lasting from September 15 to November 3.

See Call for Entry for details.

Lutheran Foundation looks at Mental Health

Marcia Haaff considers herself the ultimate optimist.

Her job as CEO for The Lutheran Foundation is probably a perfect match.

“I always see the good in everything,” said Haaff, who on Oct. 2 celebrated her 25th anniversary as the foundation’s top executive – the first and only person to hold that job.

Mental health often draws more attention during the holidays when some people are lonely, grieving loved ones who have died or trying to cope with other issues – including this year’s global coronavirus pandemic.

But Haaff has not wavered in her intent to effect change.

The Lutheran Foundation she leads is a nonprofit that serves northeast Indiana with a faith-based goal to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness. The foundation gives about 60% of its funds to Lutheran congregations, schools and ministries and about 40% to the local community.

Haaff is credited with being instrumental in the foundation’s investing of more than $179 million in the Fort Wayne area since 1996.

The CEO uses the virtual world 2020 has forced upon us as a safe place for her staff to express individual feelings and discuss how to support one another. Haaff uses staff meetings to assess mental wellness, asking staff members how they are. Staff can respond with a thumbs-up if they are OK, a thumb sideways if they are not too great and a thumbs-down if they are not OK.

“Without mental health, you cannot have spiritual and physical health,” Haaff said.

Cheryl Taylor, the former president and CEO of the Foellinger Foundation, said she and Haaff have been walking in parallel steps for 25 years.

“One of the wonderful opportunities Marcia has is being the first and only CEO of the Lutheran Foundation,” Taylor said. “Anytime a person has an opportunity to take on a position that no one has ever had before, that presents both a challenge and a chance.”

Taylor said the challenge is how to lead in a way that sets a standard. The chance is to “strike out boldly” and do something good in the community.

“One of Marcia’s greatest gifts is that she appreciates that balance and she took that chance,” Taylor said.

Mayor Tom Henry also commented on Haaff’s influence.

“I appreciate and value the important role that Marcia has in our community and the positive difference she is helping lead,” he said in a statement. “Her leadership and tenacity, particularly in the areas of mental health and proactive substance abuse treatments and care, have been instrumental in helping individuals and families in need.”

“The Lutheran Foundation is a tremendous asset and under Marcia’s direction is a vital part of Fort Wayne being a caring and giving city that cares about one another,” he added.

Haaff said she loves being the face of the foundation, which has 13 staff members, but she also takes pride in being a connector.

She has spent a large portion of her time with the foundation building relationships within the Fort Wayne community, including with teachers and police officers.

“Marcia is very cognizant of (the value of) that connection,” Taylor said.

Other local leaders agree. Haaff was named Community Partner of the Year in 2019. The award is given by the Allen County Department of Health.

Haaff marvels that despite 1 in 5 people dealing with mental illness, there is still a stigma, including in faith organizations.

Often a congregation will rally to cook casseroles when someone is physically injured, but there is not as much understanding with mental issues, an invisible illness, she said.

Haaff and her team conducted a survey in 2019 and learned that people didn’t know where to go or how to access resources when faced with mental illness. The Lutheran Foundation launched LookUpIndiana.org, which was funded by a grant from the Division of Mental Health and Addiction. The website provides information about mental/behavioral health and wellness.

The first “Look Up Faith Conference on Mental Health” was in 2019 with the goal of raising awareness in a safe environment. About 700 people attended, and a conference is in the works for 2022 with the hope to further education within congregations on mental illness.

The needs of 92 congregations, 19 schools and various ministries are always among the foundation’s top priorities for 2021.

“Our work,” she said, “will continue on.”

As featured in the Journal Gazette Dec. 29, 2020.

Hispanos Unidos offers fun and inclusive atmosphere

By: Lydia Braswell

Bella Haraguchi’s dance skills are paying off.

The president of Hispanos Unidos taught a Latinx hip-hop dance class on Nov. 21 that represented the culture of the Purdue Fort Wayne club well.

“Dancing is what brings families together,” says the PFW sophomore, explaining that Hispanos Unidos is an inclusive campus club open to all PFW students– not limited to students of Hispanic heritage.

The environment of the fitness studio transpired that sentiment during the dance. Some who attended had a background in dance, and others– like me– had very little prior experience. All six of the dancers continually encouraged each other to keep going and focus on having fun.

Daddy Yankee’s song “Que Tire Pa Lante” played repeatedly from a loudspeaker as we practiced the routine for a total of two hours– including several much-needed breaks for water and fruit snacks. We had an ever-changing audience as students continually peeked their heads in to see what we were up to, and some even stayed to learn a section of the dance.

Libni Sedano attended the hip-hop class and loves to dance in her spare time. Rather than dancing professionally, Sedano learned from her family, as she says dancing is a key tradition for Hispanic families.

The PFW sophomore is majoring in finance and Spanish, and has been part of Hispanos Unidos for two semesters. She said she joined because she likes to be part of people sharing her cultural background.

Haraguchi says that, at parties, dancing isn’t really about getting a work out. The purpose is to feel connected with friends and family, especially in Hispanic culture – whether it’s dancing with a partner, a friend, or a group.

“You eat and then burn [the calories] right off!” Sedano says. “If you get hungry again, there’s more food!”

The Latinx teacher has a diverse background in dance. Starting for fun in elementary school, she began learning elite dance in a studio in middle school and continued through high school. She has competed in a variety of competitions, including ballet, jazz, contemporary, lyrical and hip-hop.

The 20-year-old has stopped dancing professionally but still does hip-hop dances, and her skills were evident as she taught the Latinx class with ease.

“I still love dancing a lot,” says Haraguchi. She also had a chance to teach in September– another Latinx hip-hop combo that was a fundraiser for Hispanos Unidos. The club president and chemistry major stepped up as a leader after the scheduled teacher of the class never showed up.

Teaching hip-hop is not the first time Haraguchi showed her leadership skills. When the soon-to-be-freshman was touring PFW in 2018, she found out that Hispanos Unidos would no longer be a club unless someone volunteered to be president and get students involved.

Haraguchi took on the role and has since been a leader for her club and for her campus.

Haraguchi volunteered to teach on Nov. 21, planning the event herself following the success of the last class. She hopes that those who attended learned more about dancing.

“Dancing doesn’t require much experience or technique,” says Haraguchi. “It’s about feeling the music and having fun with others.”

After fine-tuning our dance moves, we recorded the routine and it is posted on the Instagram page for Hispanos Unidos. None of us were required to be featured in the video, but after a little extra self-esteem boost for the more shy dancers in our group, all six who learned the routine agreed to be recorded. Once again, an encouraging atmosphere was fostered with the help of the Hispanos Unidos club members, and the attitude was contagious.

 

Carolina Baltazar has personally experienced the inclusive nature of the club.

Baltazar attended a private school for most of her education. Born in America and growing up in a family with Mexican heritage, Baltazar’s family speaks Spanish at home. She thought that going to a public school in third and fourth grade would allow her to feel more included after being in a private school with very little diversity, but even though she found a group of people to hang out with, she still did not feel fully accepted.

Baltazar says she thought people at the private school viewed her as a Hispanic girl who didn’t have high standards and acted “ghetto” with no manners. Her friends at the public school would tell her that she acted “white” and Baltazar could not find the balance between the two labels.

The PFW freshman says she was so excited to join Hispanos Unidos and finally be with a group that does not care about labels. “I’m with my people,” says Baltazar.

Baltazar hopes to be part of the club’s advertising committee to spread the word and form a stronger PFW community.

Haraguchi says future classes may be possible after the night’s turnout, with a grand total of 11 who signed the safety waiver and attendance forms. The free class was open to all PFW students and staff.

The Latinx hip-hop dance class was taught in the Hilliard Gates Fitness Studio, located inside the Hilliard Gates Sports Center, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 21 as posted on the Instagram pagefor Hispanos Unidos.

Anyone who wants to learn more about Hispanic culture and be involved in a group dedicated to inclusivity is welcome to join Hispanos Unidos.

Three Rivers Visiting Dogs fosters love and reduces stigma

By: Lydia Braswell

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month is at its close, but Three Rivers Visiting Dogs promote visibility all year round. The Fort Wayne-based organization has a goal to reduce the stigma with the help of trained dogs certified to make a difference in our community.

College students engaged in activities during Mental Health Week at Purdue University Fort Wayne to raise awareness and help prevent suicide – the second leading cause of death among people aged 10-34, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

The center of attention was dedicated to floppy ears and wagging tails who welcomed love and attention from students as we took a break from dealing with the daily stresses of college life.

“It really helps the kids– coming here, petting the dogs,” said Bob Everest, founder of the nonprofit. “It lowers your blood pressure and changes things in your day that are going bad.”

Trained service dogs can detect oncoming anxiety and provide stress relief, according to Medical News Today. Three Rivers Visiting Dogs’ immersion into the Fort Wayne community gives the team members a chance to share their own stories and show that mental health issues don’t have to always be associated with negative memories.

Ginger is a Cavalier lap dog with a special talent for service to her owner. To some, she is a physical reminder that a person relies on her help to tackle their daily life. To others, she is a reminder that mental health issues don’t have to be kept secret.

Charlotte Coburn, Ginger’s owner, reminisced on how she bonded with her service dog. “We got her for our 50th wedding anniversary… and that was ten years ago,” Coburn said with a laugh.

Raising awareness is a primary way to reduce the stigma around mental health. PFW’s counseling center is a free, convenient resource for the general public that has not been heavily advertised. Dr. Joel Givenz, a counselor at the center, explained how the “disease model” impacts a person’s choice to either stay quiet about the issues they tackle or not tackle them at all.

“Depending on cultural norms, sometimes a person will believe that counseling is for ‘crazy people’ or ‘really sick people’, so sometimes counseling is associated with severe mental illness, and that’s kind of the disease model,” Dr. Givenz explained.

Sending positive messages about seeking professional help is necessary for turning over the stigma. Tim Hill, counselor-in-training at PFW’s center, said that one benefit of forming a connection with a client is creating an environment for change.

“It’s no different than if they had a cold and they went to see their doctor,” said Hill, who juggles a full-time job and providing for his family with volunteering as a counselor. “It’s still just a part of who they are, and if they think they need to improve it… then we are here and willing to help.”

Three Rivers Visiting Dogs and local counselors are doing their part to foster a welcoming environment that reduces stigma. We as a community can get involved, too. Dr. Givenz said that the more that students are involved with awareness events, the more the stigma is lowered, concerns are normalized, and people can talk about those concerns without embarrassment.

Sessions at the counseling center can be scheduled in Room 131 of the Dolnick Learning Center for Mondays 5-8 p.m, Tuesdays 12-2:30 p.m, Tuesdays 5-8 p.m, Wednesdays 5-8 p.m, and Thursdays 5-8 p.m. Call 260-481-5405 for more information.

Dr. Givenz and Everest both said that mental health professionals are transforming the way they think about treatment, and the presence of therapy dogs raises awareness for visibility. “We see the importance of touch,” said Dr. Givenz. “When it comes to an animal, it could be doing a lot of work for a person just to have something soothing nearby.”

Everest founded Three Rivers Visiting Dogs in 2000. He and his team of about 100 members go to suicide prevention events, health fairs, hospitals, and nursing homes throughout the year. The team’s many experiences led the founder to share stories that show the mental and physical impact dogs in his organization have on the public.

“We’ve had people in comas waking up petting a dog,” Everest said. “We can’t explain it… but they do a big thing.”

Everest said that he has been on several visits to people with Alzheimer’s who remember their time with the dog, and even the pet’s name, but not anything else. In another instance, the dog encouraged progression in a burn victim. Over the course of several visits, the patient went from only being able to pet the dog with one finger to embracing the animal with strength.

The team trains dogs in an immersive eight-week program to determine how they react and interact. A simple test such as bringing the dog in a hospital elevator can play a factor in whether they become certified therapy dogs or not.

Ginger passed the program with flying colors despite her own disability. “She’s completely deaf, but you would never know,” Everest said. “She loves what she’s doing.”

Three Rivers Visiting Dogs works with the National Alliance on Mental Illness by attending support groups for people with mental illness and their families every Tuesday night to reduce the stigma.

NAMI provides free crisis counseling by texting NAMI to 741-741. The National Suicide Hotline is 1-800-273 TALK (8255).

Editor’s note: A related version of this news article was featured on the Journal Gazette’s Nov. 12 edition.