These tests could help end your career search

By Ireland Miller

The Career Development Center at Purdue University Fort Wayne provides assessments that concentrate on helping students and alumni match their interests, strengths and education with a satisfying career.

For students who are struggling to pick a major or have little idea of what career they may want to pursue, the online assessments that the Career Development Center offers focus on an individual’s personality, interests, skills and values to help guide them in the right direction.

“It also gives you another way of looking at what you value when it comes to work and how all of that goes into developing your actual career plan,” Assistant Director of the Career Development Center Tracey Hanton said.

Assessments such as the TypeFocus 7 Career Assessment offered through the PFW website are taken online. This assessment prepares participants with questions that help guide them to their desired outcome without making the final career decision for them.

“[Assessment takers] get an opportunity to do what is very important, and that’s research,” Hanton said.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and Strong Interest Inventory (SII) assessments are also available to both students and alumni to take with an additional cost of $25 each. These tests are more extensive, giving students an in-depth idea of career options while looking at both the costs and benefits.

No preparation is required to take an assessment, but Hanton said she suggests being in a quiet room paying full attention to the questions for the most accurate test results.

“It is not something you want to spend hours thinking over. You definitely want to make sure that you don’t answer the questions the way you think you should answer them. You just really want to answer them just as they are,” Hanton said.

Assessments do not have to be taken at a certain point in time. Although not required, career assessments can be taken multiple times throughout a student’s life in order to address the question, “Did I change?”

“I think a person should take an assessment when they’re in college, sometimes even before, and depending on what it is that they need, they might take another one in five years,” Hanton said.

Career assessments consider the individual’s answers and generate a list of possible outcomes for their career, keeping in mind their goals and interests. However, the individual’s options are not limited to the displayed results.

“[The assessment] does not eliminate all options. Statistics say we’re going to do about 14 careers in a lifetime anyway,” Hanton said.

When taking a career assessment, individuals can seek help navigating their results by scheduling an appointment with PFW’s Career Development staff.

The information can be found under the Career Development tab on the university’s home page.

Edited by Lydia Reuille

Make career moves with Handshake

Caitlin Laubsch | 10.8.21

Handshake may be just one of many available resources for students at Purdue Fort Wayne through the Career Development Center, but the program has become one of the most heavily endorsed programs by PFW’s Career Development Center.

Handshake is a website that is available to all PFW students and alumni. The platform is accessible online.

The website is a resource designed to help students find jobs and entry-level careers. The program allows a user to follow employers to see their job listings, see reviews of companies by past employees, see how many applicants an employer is looking to hire and more. The platform provides a way to have direct communication with potential employers and see information about career fairs and events.

When a user starts out on Handshake, they can create a profile to share with employers. They can upload a resume, share past job experience, share their skills and even narrow the job preferences suggested to them by industry, job interests and location.

Using the platform, students can set up job interviews, message employers, and create a profile that draws employers to message them first. Handshake suggests jobs based on the profile and the entire program is very customizable and individual. The job search can be narrowed down by location, full-time or part-time, on-campus or off-campus and can even be tailored to help you find internships.

Handshake also includes a “Discover More Students” tab, creating an opportunity for students of similar interests to connect and collaborate with each other.

Tracey Hanton, the assistant director for career development at Purdue Fort Wayne, works in the Career Development Center on campus. She said students are automatically registered for Handshake when they register for their first classes at PFW.

“You can make appointments with our office, you can find out about events that we’re hosting, or events that we are collaborating with,” Hanton said. “But more importantly, because it’s online, you can find events that are online that aren’t even in the area.”

Handshake is unlike any other job-search website, according to Hanton, who said that the employers are specifically looking for PFW students when they register their jobs on Handshake.

“The employers that are on our site, they actually have to register for each school that they want to be a part of to actually post their jobs,” Hanton said.

Hanton also said that Handshake is unique because “[the employers] do have a ranking and a trust score, so if there’s a company on there that somebody has found they are scamming students, we get an alert. Indeed is not going to give you an alert that this company has been scamming students.”

Details on Handshake can be found online.

Caitlin Laubsch | 10.8.21

COVID-19 impacts collegiate soccer recruitment of high school athletes

By Tianna Johnson

 

High school athletes are struggling to find their fit to play at the next level.

 

“As a coach, it has been a tough year to see how hard my athletes work while witnessing their struggles to get seen in hopes to continue their soccer careers due to the pandemic,” said Mike Friendt, head coach of North Metro Girls u18 team.

 

With the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the world, one thing that has drastically changed is the recruiting process for collegiate athletics, specifically soccer players.

 

The NCAA announced at the beginning of the pandemic they were implementing a ‘dead period.’ This is a time when there are no visits, scouting, camps, or evaluation of prospects.

 

As the pandemic continues to be an issue, the dead period continues to get extended, leaving future prospects working against the clock.

 

Traditionally, in the recruiting world of collegiate soccer, coaches are able to see future prospects at camps hosted by the school or at the prospect’s games. This would happen during the prospect’s junior and/or senior year of high school.

 

When a college coach becomes impressed by a player’s abilities on the field, they will then continue their interest over phone calls, emails, and texts. The communication and interest lead to the coach having the player come to campus so they can show the player what the school has to offer and have them meet the team.

 

Schools around the country have faced major budget cuts due to the lack of competition and other COVID-19 related changes.

 

Due to the “COVID year” collegiate institutions have been left with less scholarship money available to give to the athletes currently in the NCAA, which results in an additional year of competition available to the collegiate athletes that had one of their eligibility seasons canceled or drastically altered due to the pandemic.

 

In cases where the athlete is on a scholarship and chooses to accept the extra fifth year, the athletic program will sponsor the athlete with money that would traditionally go to an incoming freshman. This impacts the incoming recruiting prospects because it leaves less money and scholarships available than in a traditional year.

 

The head coach of the Purdue University Fort Wayne soccer team, Jason Burr, mentioned that typically coaches only anticipate a player staying for four years and allocate money as if that’s the case.

 

High-school senior and soccer player Bella Grandbois was planning to attend California Baptist University, but she said that due to the “COVID year” the program offered one of their seniors money for the extra year that would have potentially gone to her.

 

“I had always known the recruiting process would be challenging but never expected it to be the way it is now,” she said.

 

Bella’s teammate, Sydney Johnson, is also facing challenges in the recruitment process this year.

 

“It has definitely been hard, especially because most of the scholarship money depended on how much was left due to the pandemic and not how much we deserved based on our play like it would be in a more traditional situation.”

Online Learning Challenges

By Natalie Konow

 

Schools in Allen County have been conducting many classes online since March 2020. This has been the safest way to allow schools to continue teaching students, but this does not mean it was the easiest for everyone.

 

During the pandemic, staying motivated to complete online assignments was considered a major issue for 42% of students in America.

 

Amelia Adams, a sophomore student at Northrop High School who has ADHD, is one of them. She says that she finds herself getting distracted frequently by thinking about previous or upcoming situations or by objects in her household.

 

“My hyperactivity disorder has made it difficult for me to focus online. The teachers don’t have the ability to keep me on track, which has caused my grades to decrease since March of 2020,” Adams says. “The school seems to have no effective additional assistance for those with learning disabilities.”

 

Adams says that Northrop High School is not requiring its teachers to hold Zooms for every class. Some are conducted by the students signing in on a Google form and finishing the work required for that day, which is provided via Powerschool.

 

The lack of direct communication and instructions has left students like Adams frustrated and disorganized. The process of holding classes online makes it difficult to accommodate lessons, tasks, or assignments for those with learning disabilities.

 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that those with ADHD learn best when assignments are clear and structured, when students are able to pick how learning comprehensions are assessed either through essays, oral reports, hands on projects, etc., and by minimizing distractions.

 

These CDC recommendations are challenging to administer over the Internet, which may be a cause of the 25% increase in students falling behind the baseline ability needed to continue in future learning or functioning in society.

 

Elementary schools are experiencing similar situations with their students with disabilities and issues of focusing on schoolwork throughout the day.

 

Courtney Bailey, principal of Cedar Canyon Elementary, says that parents have expressed concerns on how hard it is to keep them focused and on track. “By the time that they finish they should be done, but because they can’t focus during the day, they are spending more time at night doing additional work,” Bailey says.

 

Bailey says her school is tackling these issues by tailoring and structuring lessons so that a child will have certain expectations and requirements that they must complete in a certain amount of time.

 

Cedar Canyon teachers are helping students with disabilities by marking whether or not a student has a learning disability and are obligated to specify the particular disability they have, so that all instructors are aware and can make adjustments for that individual if needed.

 

The school is keeping track so that each student is meeting their required number of minutes for special education assistance. The school is also trying to continue academic success for students– not just during school hours, but even after the computers are off.

 

Despite focus being a major issue for many students, Bailey says that the academic success of the student does not solely rely on whether or not they can focus. It is highly dependent on their homelife and the supports they have at home.

 

Students tend to do better when they have a parent there guiding them through online courses and encouraging them to stay engaged, compared to students who have to do distant learning independently.

 

Although online learning has been a challenge for many with learning disabilities, some have had the chance to turn these challenges into opportunities.

 

Adams says that online learning has allowed her to think of creative ways to stay attentive to her classes that she will continue to use even once in-person classes start.

Pink Tax: The Hidden Cost of Being Female

By: Jordyn Bilger

We all know the saying “beauty hurts.” But it might be hurting more than just our feet– it may also be hurting the bank accounts of many women.

 

It’s no secret that women have experienced different forms of oppression since the beginning of time. From not being able to work outside of the home to not being able to vote, a lot of changes have been made in efforts to get equal rights and treatment for the female gender.

 

But there is something that women may not be aware of that is part of this ongoing struggle: the pink tax. The pink tax is the extra amount that women pay for everyday products like razors, shampoo, clothing and more, according to Good Housekeeping.

 

This is not like the sales tax applied at a register; rather, it is included in price. This has been around since the 1990s and continues to be seen in comparing the cost of men’s and women’s products.

 

Males pay less than females for everyday products 42% of the time, according to an investigation conducted by personal finance writer Candice Elliot.

 

This is especially seen in clothing items where women’s clothes are of lesser quality than men’s but are often significantly higher in price. With thinner materials- and often less fabric- used in women’s clothing, the prices even for the same brand are raised compared to pricing of items for men.

 

The higher price is called ‘pink tax’ because the color pink is marketed towards females, and some products cost more just for being the color pink (and sometimes purple).

 

This extra cost can give those who struggle with money even more trouble.

 

“As a full-time college student with not a lot of funds, having to pay extra on almost all of my everyday products just makes it that much harder to save and budget,” said college student Emma Yager.

 

Are there any brands working to stop the pink tax? In an interview with Glamour, Nitasha Mehta, the head of vendor marketing for Boxed, said that she spoke with the CEO of the company about the difference in pricing. Since then, the company has been working to make fair prices for both genders.

 

Billie is another company that works to charge women the same prices as men. Almost all women’s razors cost more than men’s for a lower quality. Billie is an online razor company that allows women to pay low prices for a higher quality razor and can be purchased as a subscription.

 

“The company launched its #AxThePinkTax campaign in April of this year to advocate for equal pricing for products,” Glamour said.

 

The pink tax is hard for stores to avoid unless prices are lowered by the companies that make the products, and since so many people are unaware of these hidden fees, it doesn’t get talked about often.

 

Leslie Owen, a financial advisor for Allen Superior Court, said that she has never really noticed the pink tax because it has just been there for as long as she can remember.

 

The Indiana House Bill HB1226 was introduced in 2020, which if passed would provide a sales tax exemption for feminine hygiene products.

 

With more information spread about pink tax reality, the issue could be fixed.

CALLING ALL LATINX ARTISTS!

Self-identifying Latinx and Hispanic artists of all mediums are encouraged to submit work for consideration to be displayed in the premiere event Colors of Life: Latina Artists for National Hispanic Heritage Month.

As part of the second annual Día de los Muertos celebration, the exhibit at Creative Women of the World downtown will honor artists in coordination with National Hispanic Heritage Month, which takes place from September 15 to October 15.

Creative Women of the World is a nonprofit fair-trade store that supports female leaders worldwide. The storefront is host year-round to products that celebrate talent of women who seek to build on their entrepreneurial skills.

The artwork submission deadline is April 23, with exhibit dates lasting from September 15 to November 3.

See Call for Entry for details.

Campus Feminists in Solidarity—A Glance at Women’s Studies and Feminism on the Purdue University Fort Wayne Campus

College Activist Group—Challenges, Misconceptions and Overcoming Obstacles

By Moriah Weaver

The women’s studies and feminist activist group, Campus Feminists in Solidarity, had its first call-out meeting of the Purdue University Fort Wayne fall semester last Tuesday, Nov. 12.

The group seeks to create a community which can relate through common values regarding feminism and gender equality. They also hope to provide educational opportunities for students wanting to better understand the goals of the women’s studies program.

“Our goal is to provide a safe space for feminists on Purdue Fort Wayne’s campus,” said CFS president Shelby Thomas.

Thomas said the group strives to initiate discussions in which students do not feel held back in sharing what is on their mind regarding feminism-related issues. They are also particularly interested in helping non-feminists come to a better understanding of the movement.

“For me, when I think of feminism, I think everyone is equal. Men, women, people of the LQBTQ community, people of color, people with disabilities, everyone,” she said.

When speaking with Dr. Noor Borbieva, an anthropology and women’s studies professor at Purdue University Fort Wayne, she defined feminism as gender differences not creating inequality in and of themselves.

She also said that there are many misconceptions and misunderstandings associated with feminism and the women’s studies program. The most common she hears is that women are equal in our society.

“The kinds of harassment and dehumanization and tribalization that I see all around me, in the media, in what my students suffer…is troubling,” she said. “Not a semester goes by that I don’t hear horrific stories of gender oppression from my students.”

CFS treasurer Sam Schubert said that she has heard many false accusations regarding CFS, but the most troubling is that they serve no purpose.

“People think that we sit around and complain about stuff, but we don’t actually do anything,” she said.

Other misconceptions discussed by sources include that feminist group meetings are just “man hating sessions” and that the women’s studies program is useless in the academia environment.

It is likely that these stigmas contribute to many of the obstacles faced by CFS and the women’s studies program at Purdue University Fort Wayne. The group has dealt with repeated hostility from campus community in the past.

Thomas said that she had first-hand witnessed CFS posters being taken down by other people, one being a professor at the university.

The women’s studies program has also run into issues like this, almost being removed from the university as a major in 2017.

Professor Borbieva said that she saw someone had graffitied negative words about women’s studies on one of the department’s posters just the day before our discussion.

“It took major student mobilization to preserve women’s studies,” she said. “It’s a constant battle.”

Thomas said that when the program was under threat, the women’s studies students came together to advocate and petition for its protection. This led to a change in decision from the university to keep women’s studies as a program for students.

Professor Borbieva said that women’s studies are valuable courses for students—their goals being for women to understand the challenges they face, for students to be educated on the workings of power more broadly, to foster in students a commitment to activism, and to empower students and help them understand the workings of power in their own lives.

It is these principles which are enforced by Thomas and other CFS members. They hope to further interact with the Purdue University Fort Wayne community throughout the rest of the fall and spring semesters.

Next steps for CFS includes the start of a feminist book club and what the group calls, “The F Word”, in which women’s studies affiliated faculty is interviewed and explains how their research relates to feminist ideals. They hope to have these started before the end of the school year.

Schubert said that the group also hopes to get connected with other Purdue University Fort Wayne clubs and organizations to work together in hosting events for students.

“People need to come together with people who share their views, that’s where you find power. That’s where you find affirmation and you can feel good about who you are as a person and get through social connection with other people,” said Professor Borbieva. “That’s the joy of being a human, what else is there?”

LGBT+ student center opens on campus

By: Brandon Blumenherst

As the new strategic plan for the future of Purdue Fort Wayne is defined, one of its main focus is to embrace diversity, equity and inclusion. A new center on campus provides a better visual reference of the campus becoming a more inclusive place.

The LGBT+ Resource Center opened in early October in Walb Student Union on Purdue Fort Wayne’s campus.

The center serves as a space for students to hang out and study, but also serves to be a “first-stop shop” for people with questions about the LGBTQ community, said Jordan Sanderson, coordinator of the Resource Center.

“We wanted a safe space for students, but we also wanted to educate people,” Sanderson added. The center hosts multiple workshops throughout the year on various topics related to gender identity, sexuality, and LGBTQ history. The Center also has a small library filled with LGBTQ literature.

Sanderson said that the center is usually full of students either swinging by between classes or studying in the back room. However, he was somewhat surprised by the amount of people who decided to visit the office. “I didn’t expect people to come in so frequently with questions,” said Sanderson. He added that many of them were not a part of the LGBTQ community, but they were “so willing to learn, which is something we don’t see very often.”

The center opened just prior to the Strategic Planning Committee sending out a campus climate survey focused on embracing diversity, equity and inclusion. Sanderson believes that the survey is a step in the right direction and more research is needed on the campus climate to identify needs within the campus community for LGBTQ students and staff.

“With 19% of the freshman class identifying as a part of the LGBTQ community or preferring not to answer, there is a significant part of our student population who could utilize this center,” Sanderson said. Although the center is open to everyone, the demographic justification added to the need for a student center after years of having various LGBT+ groups working to represent students on campus.

Hugo Mata, a student who frequently visits the Resource Center, said that the Center is a great place to provide a safe and affirming environment for LGBTQ students and he is spreading the word about the Center.

“Whenever I meet someone in the [LGBTQ] community, I tell them about the office. It’s usually just by word of mouth that I’ve seen more students come to the office,” Mata said. In addition to word of mouth, some students stop in after walking past the office.

As one walks through the hallway, the office emanates rainbow light from the signature Pride wall and all of the rainbow décor within. The walls are adorned with pictures of LGBTQ icons including Sharice Davids, a United States Senator from Kansas, and Billy Porter, a fashion icon and activist.

Vic Spencer, the Center’s director, explained in an email that their current priorities are “to elevate the visibility of both the Center and our LGBTQ population.” They said that the center plans to “expand [the center’s] programming” to include other aspects of LGBTQ health, history, and advocacy activities.

A 2019 Human Rights Campaign report, the Municipal Equality Index, also recently rated Fort Wayne with a score of 40 out of 100. This report is “based on its laws, policies, and services of municipalities on the basis of their inclusivity of LGBTQ people.” Out of nine cities scored in Indiana, Fort Wayne had the worst score. Terre Haute scored 42, while other major cities like Indianapolis and Bloomington scored 89 and 100 respectively.

Future renovations of downtown Fort Wayne

By: Kayla Wisniewski

The Public Works Division will be replacing existing historical brick pavement from Hoagland to Webster on Butler Street. The City Council discussed the project on Oct. 22 at City Hall in Fort Wayne.

They will be constructing a new base setting, brick pavers, replacing castings, upgrading ADA ramps and repairing sidewalks within the next month.

The project will cost $1,000 a foot, which is almost $0.5 million for 560 feet. The committee explained that although it is an expensive project, it holds integrity for a historical value and will help the neighborhood property values rise.

Shan Gunawardena, the director of Public Works, explained how by improving the city of Fort Wayne, the living conditions for citizens will be accommodated for and more people will want to live there. “We want to serve the community here in Fort Wayne to a high standard where everyone feels that they live in a clean and safe environment,”Gunawardena said.

The division comprises of 11 department services which include street and traffic lighting, leaf collection, street sweeping, snow and ice control, recycling and the city’s transportation system. The Division of Public Works maintains and improves many different areas in Fort Wayne.

The Public Works Division website stated that Public Works supports the citizens of Fort Wayne as well as accommodates for the neighborhoods, businesses, and development projects.

Gunawardena said it’s important that Fort Wayne has a strong Public Works Division because the city is very large in population and has many businesses. Gunawardena explained the department really puts in the time on developing projects to fulfill what the city needs in terms of repair and stability.

Michelle Nelson, the board of Public Works manager, gave details on improvements by the Public Works Division in Fort Wayne. “Our department is always working on projects to help improve the city and continue to service the community,”Nelson said.

Some of the recent improvements were the reconstruction of the Edsall Avenue bridge over the Norfolk Southern Railroad, and the widening of Dupont Road with new sidewalk, trail, street lighting and landscaping. Also, the realignment and widening of State Boulevard from Spy Run Avenue to Cass Street with a new bridge, sidewalk and trail. The department is continuing to propose new projects and starting many more.

“We are excited to start this project on the historical brick pavement because the roads will be in great conditions for drivers and pedestrians,”Nelson said. The start of many of the departments projects revolves around the convenience the finished product will have. Nelson said that she believes this project will have that effect and put Fort Wayne in a better state. “The Public Works department has put a lot of time and thought into this project,”Nelson explained.

A citizen of Fort Wayne, Alyssa Krause, expressed that the Public Works Division has improved her living in the city through the road work. The road leading into her apartment complex was rough with potholes and other issues. “This year they not only filled in potholes but completely redid the road and I can drive smoothly now,”Krause said.

Krause explained how the city should be working on the time length it takes to finish the roads. “I understand it’s a long process, but I feel like they start a lot of projects at one time rather than focusing on one at a time”Krause said. She believes by funding the department more, it will help improve the way of living in the city of Fort Wayne.

The project on Butler Street is set to be completed on April 17, 2020.

Budget for the Greater Fort Wayne

By: Tze Wan Goh

Mayor Tom Henry announced the 2020 Fort Wayne City budget, which mainly focuses on public safety on Sept. 19 at the city council meeting. The aim of the budget focuses on strengthening neighborhoods and providing important and necessary services to residents, neighborhoods and businesses, according to the mayor.

The budget will contribute additional 15 new police recruits to the Fort Wayne Police Department academy class, four new police K-9 units, a new explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) robot and x-ray system for the bomb unit, which is part of the Fort Wayne Police Department’s Special Operations Division.

In conjunction to the increase budget for the Fort Wayne Police Department, there will be 480 officers patrolling the streets in the city to make sure that the public is safe. The mayor is aiming to have full target staffing for both the Fort Wayne Police Department and Fire Department with the allocated budget.

“Fort Wayne is a safe city. Our top priority is ensuring the safety and protection of residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and visitors,” Mayor Henry said. “We will continue to implement best practices as a community committed to being the very best.”

Fort Wayne’s crime rate has decreased this year, according to a joint statement released on Oct. 29 by Mayor Tom Henry and Police Chief Steve Reed. Homicide rates have decreased 44.44 percent, non-fatal shootings decreased by 16.09 percent and violent crime rates decreased by 7.3 percent, in comparison with the first three quarters of last year.

However, according to the September cumulative crime rate statistics from the Fort Wayne police department website, there were 19 homicides this year and 29 in 2018 during the years’ first three quarters, which is a decrease of 34 percent instead of 44 percent.

Joe Knepper, communications director for Republican mayoral candidate Tim Smith, stated in response that mayor Henry might be lying about the numbers, or is misleading “the public putting his election ahead of the truth,” according to News Sentinel.

Ruth Girma, a Purdue Fort Wayne student who has been living in Fort Wayne for more than 10 years, said that Fort Wayne is safe, and she did not need to worry about safety like she would when she was living in Chicago. She said that she had called the police in the past and the police officers responded efficiently by getting to where they needed to be on time and being very kind, patient and empathetic.

“To my knowledge I think that the crime rate in Fort Wayne is pretty low. There are some crimes here and there, but it is nothing compared to other big cities,” Girma said.

According to the Uniform Crime Reports released by the FBI, the crime rates in Chicago are higher than Fort Wayne. The city of Chicago, with a population of about 2.7 million, registered 27,357 reports of violent crimes – 563 of them were murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. Fort Wayne had 1,024 reports of violent crimes, including 40 for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, in a city of about 260,000.

Girma said that it is good to have extra precaution and adding more safety personnel in Fort Wayne will make people feel that they are living in a safe area. She said that this new budget will improve the safety of Fort Wayne.

“Anytime the police department gets more money, it allows the police to do more things and to do the things they’re already doing in a much better way. So, more money always helps,” said Trent Ruble, a Purdue Fort Wayne police officer.

Officer Trent gave some insights on the money allocation among the different departments in the city. “Since the city only has a certain amount of money and the other city departments have their needs as well, without knowing those needs, it is difficult to say if the police department is getting the right amount of money,” said Ruble.

Other than public safety, the 2020 Fort Wayne City budget is mainly focusing on neighborhood infrastructure and parks. Out of the $36.3 million that constitute the total budget for infrastructure projects, $23.9 million is allocated for neighborhood infrastructure projects, $1.4 million for bridges, $8 million for sidewalks and alleys, and $3 million for city park projects.

“We’re a city on the move with unprecedented momentum and excitement. By working together, 2020 will be an outstanding year in Fort Wayne as we strive for excellence in providing the best services possible to the public,” mayor Henry said.

Fort Wayne has achieved national recognition in 2019, having the lowest cost of living for four years in a row, according to Niche. It is also ranked as the 12th best run city and 10th best real estate market in the country by WalletHub, and 40th best place to live in the country by U.S. News & World Report, according to the City of Fort Wayne website.